Canada - Québec -Bas-Saint-Laurent

Couvent de la Congrégation de Notre-Dame

Couvent de la Congrégation de Notre-Dame, institution founded in 1856, Kamouraska, Quebec, [between 1858 and 1918]. Archives Congrégation de Notre-Dame - Montreal.

École ménagère de la Congrégation de Notre-Dame / École normale classico-ménagère / Institut familial Chanoine-Beaudet

École ménagère de la Congrégation de Notre-Dame / École normale classico-ménagère / Institut familial Chanoine-Beaudet, institution founded in 1905, Saint-Pascal-de-Kamouraska (Saint-Pascal), Quebec, [after 1958]. Archives Congrégation de Notre-Dame - Montréal.

École Marguerite-Bourgeoys

École Marguerite-Bourgeoys, institution founded in 1946, Saint-Pascal-de-Kamouraska (Saint-Pascal), Quebec.

Couvent Notre-Dame-de-Liesse

Couvent Notre-Dame-de-Liesse, institution founded in 1809, Riviere-Ouelle, Quebec, [18-]. Archives Congrégation de Notre-Dame - Montréal.

Pensionnat de la Congrégation de Notre-Dame

Pensionnat de la Congrégation de Notre-Dame, institution founded in 1855, Rimouski, Quebec, [between 1866 and 1872]. Archives Congrégation de Notre-Dame - Montréal.

From 1851, Father Cyprien Tanguay, pastor of Rimouski, wanted to have sisters to provide education to the girls of his parish. His wish became reality four years later, following the decision made by the General Council of the Congrégation de Notre-Dame. The community was the first to send teaching sisters to the area. Sister Superior Sainte-Victoire (Julie-Adélaïde Rainville) and her companions, Sister Sainte-Marthe (Adélaïde-Restitue Morin) and Sister Saint-Ambroise (Marie-Élisabeth Dumas), moved into a one-storey wooden house with outbuildings. This structure, built in 1845, was named Maison de la Fabrique and served as a public hall and school. At the beginning of the 1855 school year, the sisters received forty-seven girls, both boarders and day students. In 1856, the building was renovated and a floor was added, permitting the structure to house a chapel. The first Mass was celebrated in 1858.

In 1871, the Congregation decided to build a bigger school. The sisters exchanged part of the school’s property for four acres of land near the church which belonged to the Saint-Germain Parish Council of Rimouski. The solemn blessing of the cornerstone took place on May 31, 1873. By the beginning of the 1875 school year, the three-storey stone and brick building was ready to receive students, even if it was not thoroughly completed. The former school was ceded to the Sisters of Charity. The costs associated with the building were higher than anticipated and, because of a recession in the region, the school received an ever-decreasing numbers of students. To overcome this financial challenge, the sisters asked the Department of Public Instruction if they could open a normal school. It was refused. In 1879, they asked Rome if they could sell their building. They asked Bishop Langevin of Rimouski to find a congregation that would replace them or that would buy the building. No community was able to help. In 1881, a fire destroyed the Seminary of Rimouski. The corporation of the Seminary bought the boarding school in 1882 and the sisters permanently left the town.

NB: This text was written using documents found in the archival holdings in our possession and does not constitute a complete administrative history of the teaching establishment.

Convent of the Congrégation de Notre-Dame

Convent of the Congrégation de Notre-Dame, institution founded in 1858, Trois-Pistoles, Quebec, [18-]. Archives Congrégation de Notre-Dame - Montréal.

In 1858 Father Léon Roy proposed the establishment of a convent in Trois-Pistoles to provide Notre-Dame-des-Neiges Parish with a school for girls. At his own expense, he built a two-story wood structure on land which belonged to the Archdiocese of Québec. With the consent of Bishop Turgeon, Father Roy invited the Congrégation de Notre-Dame to send teachers. Three Sisters accepted the invitation: Sister Saint-Alexis-de-Saint-Joseph (Marie-Marguerite Beaubien), Convent Superior, and Sisters Saint-Narcisse (Claire-Hermine Trottier de Beaubien) and Sainte-Marie-du-Calvaire (Marie-Sophie-Mathilde Chef dite Vadeboncoeur). When it opened there were fifteen registered boarders, fifteen day students; twenty more were added during the year. In 1863, because the Sisters of Jésus-Marie de la Pointe-Lévis were looking to open a house in the country for Sisters with heath issues, Archbishop Baillargeon of Québec requested that the Congregation cede either the Rimouski, Kamouraska or Trois-Pistoles convent for this purpose The one in Trois-Pistoles was the most recent and was therefore closed to fulfill this new function. 

NB: This text was written using documents found in the archival holdings in our possession and does not constitute a complete administrative history of the teaching establishment.

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